Movie Review – ‘Captain America: Civil War’

“The film’s premise is that Captain America, Iron Man and their fellow crime-fighters must be controlled and regulated by governments through the United Nations. Really? If only fighting evil were so easy. So clean and neat.”

Patrick King, REEL BRIEF

Marvel's Captain America: Civil War L to R: Falcon/Sam Wilson (Anthony Mackie), Ant-Man/Scott Lang (Paul Rudd), Hawkeye/Clint Barton (Jeremy Renner), Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), Scarlet Witch/Wanda Maximoff (Elizabeth Olsen), and Winter Soldier/Bucky Barnes (Sebastian Stan) Photo Credit: Film Frame © Marvel 2016

L to R: Falcon/Sam Wilson (Anthony Mackie), Ant-Man/Scott Lang (Paul Rudd), Hawkeye/Clint Barton (Jeremy Renner), Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), Scarlet Witch/Wanda Maximoff (Elizabeth Olsen), and Winter Soldier/Bucky Barnes (Sebastian Stan). Photo Credit: Film Frame © Marvel 2016

The concern I’ve levied at comic book superhero movies in recent years has been twofold. First, could viewers get bored from the oversaturation of a handful of DC Comics and Marvel action-centric films released each year? Secondly, if moviegoers actually did continue to overwhelmingly support these computer-generated imagery (CGI) fantasy adventures, would the studios be able to keep raising the bar for fresh ideas and storylines? With the fifth best opening weekend ever ($182 million), “Captain America: Civil War” quickly answered both of those questions this morning.

Brothers Anthony and Joe Russo (“Captain America: The Winter Soldier”) return to co-direct this latest box office winner. Seizing on the wave of media and political bashing towards law enforcement, “Civil War” sparks outrage towards The Avengers for using excessive force to stop evil on the World’s cities and streets. We’re told that the real culprits for innocent deaths to bystanders must be pinned on the first responder superheroes, not the actual criminal elements creating and directing the terror.

The film’s premise is that Captain America, Iron Man and their fellow crime-fighters must be controlled and regulated by governments through the United Nations. Really? If only fighting evil were so easy. So clean and neat. Where zero collateral damage is not just strived for, but demanded. Here, deciding whether to side with that lunacy pact or not resides Steve Rogers’ “Captain America” (Chris Evans) and Tony Starks’ “Iron Man” (Robert Downey Jr.). A disagreement between the two becomes uncivil, barely passing as plausible—but vastly more entertaining than DC Comics’ disaster “Batman v. Superman” two months ago.

Captain America: Civil War” is not the best Marvel Comics film in the collection. In fact, it’s not even the best from Marvel so far in 2016 (read: “Deadpool”). But this movie is still worth checking out. Be prepared, however, for a meeker, less charismatic and fun Iron Man.

Shiny new Marvel toys appear along with a couple of more recent superhero rollouts, combining to steal this movie with impeccable comedic timing.  Action scenes pump much-needed life into this comic book chapter.

After the slow, drawn out and misguided political plot unfolds, this Avenger reunion finally picks up speed, spider webs and humor in its final hour.  Be sure to stay a full 10 minutes after to enjoy two story-related continuation scenes during the credits.

Grade: B

“Captain America: Civil War” is rated PG-13 for extended sequences of violence, action and mayhem.  Its running time is 2 hours and 26 minutes.

 

© 2016, Patrick. All rights reserved.



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